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In case you hadn’t noticed, we’re in a drought

And by “we”, I mean most of the state.

About 80% of Texas is currently experiencing some level of drought conditions, ranging from “moderate” to “exceptional.”

The drought, which caused wildfires across the state earlier this year and prompted burn bans, is now negatively affecting farmers and ranchers.

A lack of rain during the spring resulted in lower crop production and decreased soil moisture levels, with no relief in sight.

“This is a tough situation,” Tracy Tomascik from Texas Farm Bureau told Houston Matters on Monday, comparing this year to Texas’ historic drought in 2011. “It’s something that we hoped we’d all put in the back of our minds, but this year it has a little added sting to it.”

Hay supply is down, and 78% of the wheat supply in Texas is in “poor” or “very poor” condition.

“It’s as bad as it’s been since 2011, if not worse,” Texas State Climatologist John Nielsen-Gammon said about the state’s wheat supply. “2011 was a wake-up call… I think that experience will be of considerable help this time around.”

[…]

May and June are typically the wettest months of the year in Texas and are the prime months for plant growth. Hungry plants and no rain can quickly lead to a bad situation.

“It’s a flash drought,” Nielsen-Gammon said about the combination of factors working together to cause Texas’ current weather conditions and agricultural obstacles.

The drought is also causing water supply issues statewide as officials ask residents to conserve water.

“The way the weather pattern looks, it’s going to be like that for a while,” Nielsen-Gammon said.

While Houston has not been severely affected by drought conditions, Nielsen-Gammon said that could change.

“Coastal areas have been fairly dry, and with the high temperatures, the dryness is spreading over the whole area now.”

Remember 2011? More terrible drought, wildfires all over the state (especially around Bastrop), a whole month of daily temperatures over 100 degrees? Yeah, that. Any time 2011 is in the conversation, weather-wise, it’s a bad thing.

As far as Houston goes, it’s not that bad right now, but we know how bad it can get because we lived through 2011, too. So please, pay attention to this.

For the first time in a decade, the city is asking property owners to voluntarily cut back on water usage as low rainfall and blistering temperatures push Houston closer to drought conditions.

The solstice arrived Tuesday with temperatures up to 9 degrees hotter than average, triggering phase one of Houston’s drought contingency plan, adopted to stave off water shortages in times of dangerous heat and low precipitation.

Under the plan, residents are asked to voluntarily reduce water usage by watering plants after sunset, repairing dripping faucets and ensuring sprinkler heads do not spray directly into storm drains or streets. The requested moves could become mandatory if drought conditions worsen.

City officials hope the optional measures will cut water use citywide by 5 percent.

It marked the first time the city has entered any version of its drought contingency plan since 2011.

[…]

City officials issued the following voluntary water conservation guidelines, expected to continue until the threat of drought lifts:

  • Limit outdoor watering to twice a week after sunset and before sunrise
  • Single-family homes with even-numbered street addresses are asked to water on Sundays and Thursdays; those with odd-numbered street addresses are asked to water on Saturdays and Wednesdays, with Tuesdays and Fridays reserved for apartments and businesses
  • Check and repair water leaks from dripping faucets and running toilets
  • Fix sprinkler heads to ensure sure water is not disappearing directly into the street, storm drains or gutters

Surely that isn’t much to ask. Let’s do what we can to keep 2022 from being as bad as 2011 was.

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