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April 13th, 2014:

Weekend link dump for April 13

How to bake scientifically accurate cake planets. Because who wouldn’t want a Uranus cake for their birthday?

It’s hard out here on a pregnant TV star whose character isn’t pregnant.

All about Aereo in Houston.

If Alfred E. Neuman were a real person, you’d never be able to un-see his face.

It’s never too early to start learning how to be a hacker.

Bring PBR back to Milwaukee.

“Typography is not typically in the realm of transportation policy, and for a layman it’s a little hard to appreciate the subtle differences.”

RIP, Mickey Rooney. Here’s hoping he and Judy Garland are putting on a show in heaven.

From the Can’t We All Just Get Along? department.

David Ortiz may bring about the end of Presidential selfies.

I’m glad that Chili’s has come to its senses about what autism awareness groups to support. I just wish they’d done their homework ahead of time.

From the Don’t Know Much About Geography files.

Some bug fixes are more literal than others.

I’m down with blaming Camille Paglia regardless of the question.

On Archie Bunker, and what happens when an audience identifies with a character they’re supposed to revile.

It sure is good to be rich.

“The moral panic of the anti-D&D crusaders was sheer nonsense, but those fundie moral crusaders weren’t wrong to fear the threat that such games posed to their ideology. Fundamentalist ideology is a fragile thing, after all, so almost anything other than itself is correctly viewed as a subversive threat.”

Did you attend a Kings of Leon concert in Seattle on March 28? If so, you may have been exposed to the measles. Better check in with your doctor just to be safe.

I for one am very glad to hear that Captain Janeway is not a geocentrist.

“This is just one example of the price-fixing and taxpayer-gouging features built right into Medicare by a system that lets medical specialists figure out their own reimbursement rates behind closed doors and bars the government from negotiating on Rx drug prices.”

“If nothing else can be learned from this bizarre hunt, one thing has become clear: There’s a ton of trash in the Indian Ocean.”

Bad ways for Mad Men to end.

Jim DeMint is a truly awful person.

What you can do about the Heartbleed bug, including resources to check if websites you use were vulnerable to it. And if you don’t know what the Heartbleed bug is, XKCD explains it in a way that everyone can understand.

“I kissed her deep and hard, my tongue slapping her uvula back and forth like a speed bag. She tasted good: like sin, Altoids, and an oyster po’ boy. Maybe shrimp, I wasn’t sure. I was dizzy with lust.”

I’m old enough to remember when the movie Splash made “Madison” a hot name for girls, so the surge in babies named Khaleesi and Arya doesn’t surprise me at all.

Obstructing health care access is a life and death matter for a lot of people.

As the renowned philosopher Robin Williams once said, “When all else fails, go for the dick joke”.

Outstanding Buzzfeed story on Tom Lehrer. Read it even if you somehow don’t know who Tom Lehrer is. Via Mark Evanier, who has a video of what may be Lehrer’s last public performance in 1998.

The Todd Akin of 2014 is in Mississippi. Actually, he’s even worse, and what’s even worse than that is he’ll likely be elected.

Davis keeps up the attack on Abbott over pre-k

She is not letting up.

Sen. Wendy Davis

Sen. Wendy Davis

While addressing the Texas State Teachers Association’s convention in San Marcos on Saturday, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis accused her Republican opponent, Greg Abbott, of backing away from his early education policy proposal.

Abbott, the state’s attorney general, recently came under fire from Democrats and education advocates for language in a policy proposal that appears to call for the biannual testing of pre-kindergarten students. Although Abbott’s campaign said earlier this week that his plan does not call for such tests, Davis is keeping up the attacks.

“Under the guise of quality, he calls for putting these tests first — not our kids,” Davis said. “In his plan, his first assessment idea calls for another test for 4-year-olds. And if they don’t pass the mark, they get the rug pulled out from under them.”

Davis bashed Abbott for remarks made by campaign spokesman Matt Hirsch, who told The Texas Tribune earlier this week that assessment methods mentioned in the attorney general’s plan were “there for informational purposes only.”

“They are not part of Greg Abbott’s policy recommendations,” he said.

See here and here for the background. I don’t really have anything to say about this, I’m just using it as an excuse to reproduce beneath the fold an amazingly snarky press release from the Davis campaign that made fun of that “for informational purposes only” disclaimer. I continue to be amazed at the aggressiveness of the Davis campaign lately. As I’ve noted before, she has been setting the terms of the debate for basically the entire campaign. I don’t know how long that will last, and I don’t know how much effect it may have on the outcome, but I do know this is something we are not used to seeing, and I do know I’m enjoying it. Click on for the press release.

(more…)

Council considers hoarding ordinance

I hadn’t realized Houston didn’t already have an ordinance to deal with hoarding. Apparently, we are not at all unique in this regard.

HoardersOne

A proposed ordinance would begin to expand the city’s options for resolving hoarding situations even when the hoarder owns the property. The measure, which would not apply to single-family homes, would create fines, clarify when police could enter a property with a warrant and refer violators to social services.

If City Council approves the proposal next week, Houston could be the first city in Texas to create a specific ordinance to address hoarding, said Bennett Sandlin, executive director of the Texas Municipal League. Other cities have discussed the hoarding issue when adopting building and fire codes, he said.

“In society it’s becoming more noticeable, probably because of the notoriety from TV shows,” Sandlin said.

The Greater Houston Chapter of the Community Associations Institute, a group for local homeowner associations, supports the proposed ordinance as a starting point, but called for the inclusion of single-family homes. The group also would like to see a mechanism to assist with cleanup since the bill often falls to neighbors, President-Elect Sipra Boyd said.

Sherri Carey, a board member of the group and a property manager who has dealt with three hoarding cases in the last two years, said she wants the ordinance to mandate mental health treatment or follow-up visits to ensure the problems do not resume.

“Just like parole,” she said. “Someone to make sure they’re not breaking the law still.”

[…]

The Mental Health and Mental Retardation Authority of Harris County consulted with the city on the development of the ordinance and its executive director, Stephen Schnee, submitted a letter of support to council.

I would support including single-family homes in this ordinance. Hoarding is both a mental health problem and a public health problem. The goal of this should be to better identify people who need help, to connect them with services that can help them, and to get their property cleaned up. That’s a win all around. Fines should be used as leverage rather than as actual punishment if possible. I look forward to the discussion on this. Texpatriate has more.

We really should have expanded Medicaid

We know it would have done a lot of good, at a very reasonable cost. Turns out that cost was even less than what we had been told.

It's constitutional - deal with it

It’s constitutional – deal with it

News reports and state officials have commonly stated that expanding the Medicaid program in this fashion would cost the state about $15 billion over 10 years. Except, that figure, provided by the state Health and Human Services Commission, is actually an estimated total cost for all aspects of the Affordable Care Act, many of which the state is going to have to pay for even though state leaders have remained steadfastly opposed to almost all aspects of the law.

“What?!?,” you say?

In a presentation given to lawmakers in March 2013, state Health and Human Services Executive Commissioner Kyle Janek estimated that because of the publicity and outreach involved with the Affordable Care Act, more people who are eligible for Medicaid but not currently part of the program would likely enroll. The estimated price tag? About $6 billion over 10 years, or approximately 40 percent of the total Affordable Care Act implementation cost.

According to that presentation, the estimated cost for expanding Medicaid eligibility to all adults who make less than the 138 percent of the poverty level was about $8.8 billion over 10 years. However, the Legislative Budget Board, the Legislature’s budget arm, came up with a far lower cost estimate of about $4 billion over 10 years. The differences can be attributed to two factors, HHSC spokeswoman Stephanie Goodman said. First, HHSC projects that more people will join the Medicaid program than the LBB does; and second, HHSC projected it would cost more to provide the coverage than the LBB does.

Secondly, assume that $1.5 billion figure is correct and that adding it to the state budget would cause taxes to skyrocket and the state’s economy to crumble. However, it begs the question why that hasn’t already happened. Taxpayers in the five major urban counties in Texas — Harris (Houston), Dallas, Tarrant (Fort Worth), Bexar (San Antonio) and Travis (Austin) — already shell out more than $1.5 billion a year in hospital district taxes to provide care and facilities for their largely indigent populations. A study commissioned by Methodist Healthcare Ministries and Texas Impact estimated total local government spending on providing health care at roughly $2.5 billion a year.

Thirdly, expanding Medicaid would produce additional revenue for hospital districts, potentially allowing county governments to cut their tax rate. In Bexar County, hospital district officials estimate that expanding Medicaid would save them $52 million a year, roughly 20 percent of the amount of revenue they get from the hospital district tax, and County Judge Nelson Wolff said he would cut property taxes to pass on the savings if it were approved. In Harris County, hospital district officials say the expansion of Medicaid would mean they would receive an additional $77.5 million in reimbursements, or roughly 15 percent of their tax revenue, based on 2013 financials.

Sure would have been nice to get that extra revenue to help pay for what we’re already paying for, wouldn’t it? We can still take advantage of it if we want to. All it takes is a different set of leaders in our state government.

On a side note, remember that the 7.1 million figure you’ve been hearing for Obamacare signups is just for people going through the healthcare.gov webpage. It doesn’t count state exchanges, Medicaid enrollments, or people who got ACA-compliant policies outside of the exchange. Those first two numbers would surely have been a lot higher nationally had it not been for the cruel and mulish refusal by governors like Rick Perry to create state exchanges and expand Medicaid. There was an increase in Medicaid enrollments across the country, as people who had been eligible all along but didn’t know it or hadn’t gone through it did so thanks to the publicity push from Obamacare. Of course, the total enrollment count was much higher in states that expanded Medicaid, but Texas saw new enrollments as well. That 7.1 million number will likely be higher as well when all is said and done, thanks to some lag in the system. I’ll say it again – just imagine how many more people this law could have helped if only everyone agreed that providing coverage to as many people as possible was a worthy goal and not something to fight against. EoW has more.

The Super Bowl is making us get stuff done

Nothing like a deadline to focus the mind.

The 2017 Super Bowl not only will drive thousands of football fans to Houston, it will put a hard deadline on projects from office and hotel construction to a light-rail extension, a local developer said Wednesday.

Ric Campo, CEO of Houston-based Camden Properties and chairman of the Houston Super Bowl bid committee that successfully lobbied the NFL for the big game, said over the next three years developers and the city plan to invest $3.5 billion in downtown. By contrast, he said, the business community and city have invested a total of $5 billion there over the last 14 years.

“It creates incredible deadlines and amazing pressure to get projects done,” he said. “We’re trying to turn downtown into a 24-hour city.”

Campo told a real estate group at its monthly meeting that the Super Bowl would have a combined $500 million positive impact to the city.

He cited several projects that are now under pressure to finish in time, including a Hampton Inn and Homewood Suites, a Hyatt Place, the Marriott Marquis Convention Center Hotel and a Spring Hill Suites. At least six planned residential towers and seven office projects planned for downtown are expected to be completed in time for the big event.

As you know, there’s nothing I like more than an economic impact estimate for a major sporting event. At least for this major sporting event, the construction work being done is for things that will have a benefit for the city before and after The Big Game and would have been good to have even in the absence of said game. Now that I work downtown I have a much better appreciation of all that’s going on there. All this construction is a pain to deal with now, but it’ll be great once it’s finished. It’s reassuring to have a deadline for that.