Off the Kuff Rotating Header Image

The state responds to coronavirus

Like it or not, we need to be prepared.

Texas officials are scrambling to remain prepared for a major outbreak of a pneumonia-like disease whose global spread one expert says is now moving into “the next phase.”

From the governor’s office to hospitals to state agencies, Texas officials are intensifying efforts to plan for scenarios that could unfold now that the coronavirus is no longer relatively contained to China and surrounding countries and the number of cases is soaring in countries in Europe and the Middle East.

“I think we need to call an audible,” said Peter Hotez, an infectious disease specialist at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital. “We need to refresh the algorithms about who’s at risk and when we should suspect someone has the virus. We’re not calling it an epidemic yet, but we should start operating as if it were.”

Hotez said the disease’s spread — the number of cases in Italy and Iran, now about 900, more than doubled in two days, for instance — has made basing screening on the individual’s travel history less relevant. He also noted some recent cases have been characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms rather than respiratory symptoms.

[…]

There are 10 patients with the coronavirus in Texas, including six confirmed by the CDC and four who tested positively in Japan but whose results have not yet been confirmed by the U.S. agency. Of the 10, two came from Wuhan on a State Department-chartered flight and eight came from the Diamond Princess cruise.

There are 15 cases in the U.S. — none in Texas — that weren’t imported.

But CDC officials warned this week that it’s a matter of “when, not if” the virus arrives in the U.S. in larger numbers. The officials said people should start preparing for significant disruptions to daily life.

Noting the alarm that caused in some people who rushed out to buy water or face masks, Dr. Umair Shah, executive director of the Harris County Public Health Authority, said the remarks glossed over the timeline at which the U.S. cases are likely to significantly ramp up. He said that likely won’t be soon.

“The containment strategy in China was effective for giving everyone more time to prepare for the virus,” said Shah, noting the realistic hope was always to delay the virus’ spread, not stop it. “Governments were able to get information out and alert people to be on guard, just as they should be for the everyday flu.”

Three basic things: One, don’t panic. Two, be extra careful about what you read and especially what you share regarding coronavirus. Don’t be one of those idiots who passes along rumors and lies because you couldn’t be bothered to do a little vetting first. And three, practice good hygiene. Cough and sneeze into your elbow, wash your hands frequently, and if you do get sick, stay home. We can all do our part to make a difference.

Related Posts:

Comments are closed.