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One step closer to expanded gambling in Texas?

Maybe, though I’m not sure how much closer this really gets us.

[The] Chickasaw Nation of Oklahoma is poised to take possession of an existing horse racing track in Grand Prairie. The tribe runs one of the biggest Indian casinos in the United States, just across the Texas border.

Gambling proponents believe the tribe may tip the balance to legalizing casinos across Texas.

“The Chickasaw Nation has very successful casinos,” said Jack Pratt, chairman of the Texas Gaming Association. “They certainly didn’t buy this track just to run the ponies.”

A Chickasaw-owned company, Global Gaming Solutions LSP, is expected to buy Lone Star Park next month as part of a bankruptcy settlement involving the track’s majority owner, Magna Entertainment Corp. of Canada.

The most dramatic change Chickasaw ownership of Lone Star is likely to bring to the casino debate in Texas is to alter the dynamics of the fight in the Legislature to amend the state Constitution to allow casino gambling.

The Chickasaw Nation has put more than $362,070 into state political races since 2006. But because of its Winstar Casino on the Texas border, the Chickasaws opposed expanded Texas gambling. With the purchase of Lone Star, the tribe likely will support casino-style gambling — at least at race tracks.

A Global Gaming spokeswoman said the company will support whatever horse owners at the track believe will make Lone Star successful.

One of the biggest stumbling blocks to passing casino legislation in recent years has been infighting between track owners and casino owners. Horse and dog track owners have wanted a law that allows slot machines at tracks but no destination resort casinos. The casino industry has wanted both. Now, there will be a major horse track owner with a foot in both camps.

“Track owners have been cross-wired with the commercial casino owners,” said Pratt. “The track owners have been trying to get a monopoly.”

Mike Lavigne, a spokesman for Texans for Economic Development, an association of track owners that want slot machines at tracks, said his group sees the Chickasaw move as a positive because the tribe in the past has not supported expanded gambling, but now likely will.

Well, there certainly was some bad blood on display between the two sides of the industry this spring, so perhaps this arrangement will bring them all closer, much like the arranged marriages among European royalty in the pre-industrial days was supposed to do. I’m not convinced this makes any progress on an expansion of gambling in the near term, however. None of the constitutional amendments to expand gambling made it to a floor vote in either chamber; only one such resolution even made it out of committee. Rick Perry is still opposed, as are Kay Bailey Hutchison and Tom Schieffer, and while the Governor doesn’t have veto power over joint resolutions, he or she certainly wields influence. I suppose if the industry is serious about getting traction it ought to pour some money into Hank Gilbert’s campaign, since he’s willing to let a resolution come to a vote of the people. (Yeah, I know, Kinky supports casino gambling. I think the gambling industry is smart enough to know where not to place its chips.) Longer term, surely sooner or later a pro-gambling, or at least not-anti-gambling Governor will be elected, and then they can really push if it’s still an issue. Even then, the requirement of a two-thirds majority in both chambers is no small task, and the opposition is quite dedicated. All I’m saying is that I wouldn’t bet on anything being all that different in 2011.

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3 Comments

  1. It doesn’t matter if the governor is willing to let it come to a vote. If casino gambling is passed by a joint resolution, doesn’t that require a constitutional amendment. That isn’t up to the Governor, it is the Texas Constitution. It is a constitutional requirement that it be put to a vote.

    The governor can campaign against the amendment but he cannot get it on the ballot or keep it off the ballot. That is triggered by a joint resolution–which does not require a signature–to amend the state’s constitution. It is then an up or down vote by the voters of Texas.

    I think.

  2. Jaye – You are correct about the process. My point, however, is simply that the Governor has influence. It will be easier to pass a joint resolution to expand gambling with a Governor that favors such a thing than it will be with a Governor that opposes it.

  3. c renz says:

    Hay
    Why are all the people of Tex. who do gamble going to Lake Charles and other areas.
    sounds like we spend our money to support La, and other states. What is the problem???
    Seems like we don’t have a problem with BINGO is that not gambling??? Oh sorry it seems like it is alway thru a church.
    CR