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Schools are doing a good job not spreading COVID

Of great interest to me, as my kids have now returned to in person school.

As COVID-19 cases have risen dramatically in Texas and across the country, there is one place where the coronavirus seems to spread less than others: the classroom.

While Texas public school districts report about 41,000 students and 24,600 staff members testing positive since the start of the school year — equal to slightly less than 2 percent of those on campuses, according to state estimates — health experts said only a small share of those cases stem from in-classroom transmission.

In interviews this week, health officials from across the state described seeing “minimal,” “low” and “very, very little” spread in classrooms where students and staff are following safety recommendations. They attributed cases primarily to transmission occurring outside of schools, as well as during extracurricular activities, though it is difficult to pin down exactly where the virus is transmitted.

“In some of the schools we’ve observed where the kids can reliably stay six feet apart, can reliably wear masks, then the transmission rates appear to be very low,” said Maria Rivera, the co-leader of Harris County Public Health’s school advisory group. “Where we have seen in-classroom transmission become a problem is when the classrooms become crowded and it’s hard or impossible to keep the kids six feet apart, and when the masking may not be enforced.”

Let me note up front that not everyone cares for this description of the issue. Right now, a bit less than half of students are attending in person class. That can vary a lot by school district. Some risk factors that have been identified include extracurriculars, with sports being high on that list. Locker rooms and gymnasiums are risky places. There’s concern about kids coming back after Thanksgiving, especially if they traveled or celebrated with extended family – we ought to have a pretty good picture of that effect soon. On the flip side, the vaccine is coming, and teachers are hoping to be near the front of the line for it. My guess is we’re not back to in person learning as the norm till next school year, but maybe we’ll be able to do better than that. For now, as long as we can keep the kids and teachers and staff safe, that’s what matters.

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2 Comments

  1. Manny says:

    Since they don’t test for covid, not sure how it has been determined that they are not helping spread the virus. They check temperatures, since most young people are not likely to show symptoms they may be spreading it without knowing. Students go home for the most part to parents that are also on the young side.

  2. Elva Rodriguez says:

    False! The desks in my classroom are 3 feet apart. I have 14 PreK students in my classroom. One assistant in the morning who also checks students in the morning, does cafeteria duty, covers the front desk, comes back to my classroom then is outside at dismissal time. How safe is that?