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February 12th, 2009:

Committee assignment reactions

Rather than update the earlier post, I thought I’d do a new one rounding up various reactions to the committee assignments in the House.

Matt says the Republican “Gang of 11” won big, but Democrats got little respect.

Phillip is somewhat more sanguine. He did a ton of number crunching and other analysis, and deserves more than a one-line summary, so go read what he wrote.

Grits sees some good things for criminal justice bills.

EoW sees good things for WilCo’s freshman Rep. Diana Maldonado.

Vince thinks the Dems got rolled.

Greg is happy for his Rep., Scott Hochberg.

Equality Texas is encouraged by the Speaker’s appointments.

Finally, via the Texas AFL-CIO email list, Ed Sills says Straus “appears to have done a good job of balancing an intricate web of considerations in appointing House committees”, but he takes a look at one particular committee and sees trouble:

Judiciary & Civil Jurisprudence – Todd Hunter, R-Corpus Christi, chair; Bryan Hughes, R-Mineola, vice chair; Dan Branch; Will Hartnett; Bryan Hughes; David Leibowitz; Roberto Alonzo; Jim Jackson; Tryon Lewis; Jerry Madden; Armando Martinez; and Beverly Woolley. Panel is the so-called “tort reform” movement’s ultimate dream. Hunter returns after long absence from House to chairmanship after tort reformers funded his campaign to unseat former Rep. Juan Garcia. Unbalanced 8-3 Republican makeup recalls days when Joe Nixon took dictation from anti-lawsuit crowd at Capitol. Panel consolidates two prior committees into powerhouse that would consider both civil justice and judicial selection. Something nasty could be brewing here.

Yet another thing to keep an eye on. What’s your reaction to the committee assignments?

UPDATE: And Burka weighs in, with his take on who won and who lost.

UPDATE: The TLCV gives its scorecard numbers for members of relevant committees.

UPDATE: Banjo asks if his Rep., Dennis Bonnen, is a winner or loser.

Committee assignment reactions

Rather than update the earlier post, I thought I’d do a new one rounding up various reactions to the committee assignments in the House.

Matt says the Republican “Gang of 11” won big, but Democrats got little respect.

Phillip is somewhat more sanguine. He did a ton of number crunching and other analysis, and deserves more than a one-line summary, so go read what he wrote.

Grits sees some good things for criminal justice bills.

EoW sees good things for WilCo’s freshman Rep. Diana Maldonado.

Vince thinks the Dems got rolled.

Greg is happy for his Rep., Scott Hochberg.

Equality Texas is encouraged by the Speaker’s appointments.

Finally, via the Texas AFL-CIO email list, Ed Sills says Straus “appears to have done a good job of balancing an intricate web of considerations in appointing House committees”, but he takes a look at one particular committee and sees trouble:

Judiciary & Civil Jurisprudence – Todd Hunter, R-Corpus Christi, chair; Bryan Hughes, R-Mineola, vice chair; Dan Branch; Will Hartnett; Bryan Hughes; David Leibowitz; Roberto Alonzo; Jim Jackson; Tryon Lewis; Jerry Madden; Armando Martinez; and Beverly Woolley. Panel is the so-called “tort reform” movement’s ultimate dream. Hunter returns after long absence from House to chairmanship after tort reformers funded his campaign to unseat former Rep. Juan Garcia. Unbalanced 8-3 Republican makeup recalls days when Joe Nixon took dictation from anti-lawsuit crowd at Capitol. Panel consolidates two prior committees into powerhouse that would consider both civil justice and judicial selection. Something nasty could be brewing here.

Yet another thing to keep an eye on. What’s your reaction to the committee assignments?

UPDATE: And Burka weighs in, with his take on who won and who lost.

UPDATE: The TLCV gives its scorecard numbers for members of relevant committees.

UPDATE: Banjo asks if his Rep., Dennis Bonnen, is a winner or loser.

Lawsuit filed to force city to redistrict

Former City Council Member Carroll Robinson, who has been a strong proponent for redistricting City Council boundaries and drawing two new districts now rather than waiting till 2011, has said that the city should not fear any litigation that might result from such an action. Clearly, Robinson himself does not fear it.

Community activists have filed a lawsuit alleging the City of Houston has violated the Voting Rights Act by putting off the redistricting of city council boundaries as required by its own charter and a decades-old court settlement.

The lawsuit, which seeks to force the city to begin redrawing voting boundaries, could have far-reaching implications, including delaying an upcoming special election to fill the council seat vacated by Sheriff Adrian Garcia and, possibly, even the November elections, plaintiffs claim.

Mayor Bill White, all 13 council members and City Controller Annise Parker are named as co-defendants in the suit, which was filed in federal court today.

[…]

The city’s failure to take that action has galvanized minority leaders, who see the creation of new seats as a chance to increase the number of minorities on City Council.

“The result of that breach is lack of representation at City Hall by a significant portion of the community,” said Vidal Martinez, a former Port of Houston Authority commissioner who is litigating the suit with former city councilman Carroll Robinson.

“The need for leadership to protect the voting rights of Houstonians is why we have acted today to seek the help of the U.S. Justice Department and the federal court to make sure that the city charter is complied with,” Robinson said.

In a city made up of 41.7 percent Hispanics, 24.3 percent African-Americans and 5.3 percent Asian-Americans, according to the U.S. Census, there is one Latino council member, four African-Americans and one Asian-American.

The irony, of course, is that if the plaintiffs get what they want, the delay of the special election in District H will mean there will continue to be only one Hispanic on Council for however much longer. I guess they believe that the short-term loss is worth the long-term gain. Speaking as a resident of District H, I can’t say I’m terribly happy about this.

I just can’t excuse the decision to not take action in 2006, which would have settled all of this by now. Given that we put things off then, it makes sense to say we should wait till 2011 now. In a vacuum, I’d totally agree with that. But we could have headed this off, and we chose not to. I don’t see how the path we didn’t take could have been any messier than the one we appear to be about to take.

Lawsuit filed to force city to redistrict

Former City Council Member Carroll Robinson, who has been a strong proponent for redistricting City Council boundaries and drawing two new districts now rather than waiting till 2011, has said that the city should not fear any litigation that might result from such an action. Clearly, Robinson himself does not fear it.

Community activists have filed a lawsuit alleging the City of Houston has violated the Voting Rights Act by putting off the redistricting of city council boundaries as required by its own charter and a decades-old court settlement.

The lawsuit, which seeks to force the city to begin redrawing voting boundaries, could have far-reaching implications, including delaying an upcoming special election to fill the council seat vacated by Sheriff Adrian Garcia and, possibly, even the November elections, plaintiffs claim.

Mayor Bill White, all 13 council members and City Controller Annise Parker are named as co-defendants in the suit, which was filed in federal court today.

[…]

The city’s failure to take that action has galvanized minority leaders, who see the creation of new seats as a chance to increase the number of minorities on City Council.

“The result of that breach is lack of representation at City Hall by a significant portion of the community,” said Vidal Martinez, a former Port of Houston Authority commissioner who is litigating the suit with former city councilman Carroll Robinson.

“The need for leadership to protect the voting rights of Houstonians is why we have acted today to seek the help of the U.S. Justice Department and the federal court to make sure that the city charter is complied with,” Robinson said.

In a city made up of 41.7 percent Hispanics, 24.3 percent African-Americans and 5.3 percent Asian-Americans, according to the U.S. Census, there is one Latino council member, four African-Americans and one Asian-American.

The irony, of course, is that if the plaintiffs get what they want, the delay of the special election in District H will mean there will continue to be only one Hispanic on Council for however much longer. I guess they believe that the short-term loss is worth the long-term gain. Speaking as a resident of District H, I can’t say I’m terribly happy about this.

I just can’t excuse the decision to not take action in 2006, which would have settled all of this by now. Given that we put things off then, it makes sense to say we should wait till 2011 now. In a vacuum, I’d totally agree with that. But we could have headed this off, and we chose not to. I don’t see how the path we didn’t take could have been any messier than the one we appear to be about to take.

House committee assignments are out

At long last, we know who’ll be working on what in the House. The full list is here (PDF); a list of chairs only is beneath the fold. Evan notes that Dems got 16 of 18 chairs. The main concern of course has been with Voter ID. I would have preferred a Democratic chair, or a Republican chair with a Democratic majority, but what we got was a 5-4 GOP split with the generally non-crazy but still partisan Todd Smith as chair and an all-ideologue supporting cast: Betty Brown, Linda Harper Brown, Dennis Bonnen, and Dwayne Bohac. The Dems on the committee – Vice Chair Aaron Pena, Alma Allen, Rafael Anchia, and Joe Heflin – will have some work to do to keep anything onerous from escaping.

(I should note at this point that even with the shenanigans in the Senate, there are still things that can be done in that chamber to keep a voter ID bill from passing. And if there’s a compromise along the lines of same day voter registration plus an aggressively-pushed free ID distribution program, I might be able to live with that. Needless to say, this will be a highly visible issue.)

Beyond that, I’d have preferred an urban rep or two as the leaders of the Environmental Regs committee, but at least the seniority appointments are good, with Lon Burnam, Jessica Farrar, and Jim Dunnam. Marc Veasey was a good choice as well. For everything else, we’ll just have to see how it plays out. I still think we’re way better off now than we’d have been with another term of Tom Craddick. BOR has more.

And on a moderately related side note, you can follow Speaker Straus on Twitter. Hopefully, he’ll have a better idea of when not to use it than some other Republicans have had. Thanks to Elise for the link.

(more…)

House committee assignments are out

At long last, we know who’ll be working on what in the House. The full list is here (PDF); a list of chairs only is beneath the fold. Evan notes that Dems got 16 of 18 chairs. The main concern of course has been with Voter ID. I would have preferred a Democratic chair, or a Republican chair with a Democratic majority, but what we got was a 5-4 GOP split with the generally non-crazy but still partisan Todd Smith as chair and an all-ideologue supporting cast: Betty Brown, Linda Harper Brown, Dennis Bonnen, and Dwayne Bohac. The Dems on the committee – Vice Chair Aaron Pena, Alma Allen, Rafael Anchia, and Joe Heflin – will have some work to do to keep anything onerous from escaping.

(I should note at this point that even with the shenanigans in the Senate, there are still things that can be done in that chamber to keep a voter ID bill from passing. And if there’s a compromise along the lines of same day voter registration plus an aggressively-pushed free ID distribution program, I might be able to live with that. Needless to say, this will be a highly visible issue.)

Beyond that, I’d have preferred an urban rep or two as the leaders of the Environmental Regs committee, but at least the seniority appointments are good, with Lon Burnam, Jessica Farrar, and Jim Dunnam. Marc Veasey was a good choice as well. For everything else, we’ll just have to see how it plays out. I still think we’re way better off now than we’d have been with another term of Tom Craddick. BOR has more.

And on a moderately related side note, you can follow Speaker Straus on Twitter. Hopefully, he’ll have a better idea of when not to use it than some other Republicans have had. Thanks to Elise for the link.

(more…)

More on Schieffer

Still not sure what I think about potential Democratic gubernatorial candidate Tom Schieffer, but at least as long as he’s out there at least there will be someone who can provide some counterweight to the Rick ‘N’ Kay Show.

Although Schieffer, 61, served under Republican President George W. Bush — with whom he worked as general manager of the Texas Rangers — he says there should be no confusion about his political affiliation.

“I am a Democrat,” said Schieffer, who voted for Barack Obama in the primary and general elections.

Schieffer, the younger brother of CBS newsman Bob Schieffer, was ambassador to Japan for four years, and before that, to Australia for four years. He says he is thinking that he has something to offer in the seemingly already crowded gubernatorial race. His diplomatic career ended Jan. 20 as Bush left office.

“I’m not sure the level of debate in the state is where it ought to be,” Schieffer said.

As for the sniping in the Republican primary race between Gov. Rick Perry and Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, Schieffer said, “I think it’s about to go down a petty, mean and nasty road.”

You don’t say.

A rivalry almost 20 years in the making between Gov. Rick Perry and U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison erupted in open acrimony Monday as she accused him of playing politics to embarrass one of her supporters while he all but accused her of shirking her duties in the nation’s capital.

The verbal snipes exposed a growing bitterness between Perry and Hutchison as she prepares to challenge his re-election in next year’s gubernatorial primary.

When my daughters act like this, we put them in timeout. Sadly, that option doesn’t exist here.

Back to the original story:

Schieffer calls himself a moderate Democrat with ideas about how to make Texas competitive.

“We’ve got some substantive challenges in Texas, and we’ve got to deal with them in a substantive way,” he said.

From the outside, Schieffer said, the image of Texas is still drawn from the TV show Dallas and that the Lone Star State is not preparing the next generation to compete in a global economy.

“Kids in Texas in the first grade are competing with kids in India and China,” he said. “I’m not sure we’re preparing them for it.”

Asked about Perry, Schieffer said, “If you had better leadership, you’d have better perception.”

“People want to respond to a thoughtful government figure,” he said. “I don’t know that I’m that candidate. There’s a constituency for that kind of candidate.”

Schieffer met with friends and colleagues during his driving tour of Texas with his wife, and many encouraged him to run.

“People believe there is an opportunity for a moderate Democrat to be elected,” he said.

I’d rather have a more progressive Democrat, but beggars and choosers and all that. Schieffer has a lot of baggage to deal with – the Bush thing, the “who the heck is this old white guy?” thing, his own legislative record (thanks, Evan) – but the more he’s out there criticizing our two squabblers in chief and looking good by comparison, the farther he’ll get with that.

And hey, it’s not like we’re up to our clavicles in better options at this point.

Humorist and author Kinky Friedman may run for Texas governor again, but if he does, he says he’s serious this time.

First, he’d run with the help of a major party — the Democrats — instead of launching an independent campaign like he did in 2006.

Friedman told the Associated Press on Tuesday he learned some hard lessons from his fourth-place defeat to Republican Rick Perry in a race with three political veterans. He said he found out he couldn’t win as an independent and that he shouldn’t crack so many jokes.

“I’m toning down the one-liners a bit. If I run, it’s going to be a serious run,” said Friedman, peppering the interview with one-liners.

[…]

He said he’s been a Democrat all his life — though “not the kind of Democrat that goose-steps to the polling box” — and that he likes the direction the state party is taking.

Democrats can win the state’s highest office if they pull in what he calls grass-roots voters and small-town Texans, Friedman said. He considers rural support one of his strengths.

“I certainly like the way the Democratic Party is moving in Texas. I think the past four years it’s kind of transformed itself into a more populist … it’s in a populist direction. In other words, I think they’re moving toward Barbara Jordan and Ann Richards and (commentator) Molly Ivins… That kind of thing,” he said.

Yeah, a Democrat all his life, except for the whole 2006 election thing and his votes for Republicans – in his defense, at least he bothered to vote that year. Anything you can say against Tom Schieffer, you can say at least as much against Kinky Friedman as well, that’s all I’m saying.

Yet there may be a brighter light at the end of all this. Again back to the Star-Telegram story:

So far, no Democrats have announced that they are seeking the nomination, although [Democratic strategist Matt] Angle said that several, including state Sen. Leticia Van de Putte, D-San Antonio, are considering it.

Sen. Van de Putte would be an exciting candidate, one about whom there’d be little griping among the faithful. She’s previously been mentioned as a potential Senate candidate; good to know at least one such Democrat has a broader view of the situation. She also had a bit more than $300K cash on hand as of January, and ought to be in a decent position to raise what she’d need to compete. All of a sudden, I’m feeling a little better about the top of the ticket next year. Amazing what some hope can do, isn’t it?

More on Schieffer

Still not sure what I think about potential Democratic gubernatorial candidate Tom Schieffer, but at least as long as he’s out there at least there will be someone who can provide some counterweight to the Rick ‘N’ Kay Show.

Although Schieffer, 61, served under Republican President George W. Bush — with whom he worked as general manager of the Texas Rangers — he says there should be no confusion about his political affiliation.

“I am a Democrat,” said Schieffer, who voted for Barack Obama in the primary and general elections.

Schieffer, the younger brother of CBS newsman Bob Schieffer, was ambassador to Japan for four years, and before that, to Australia for four years. He says he is thinking that he has something to offer in the seemingly already crowded gubernatorial race. His diplomatic career ended Jan. 20 as Bush left office.

“I’m not sure the level of debate in the state is where it ought to be,” Schieffer said.

As for the sniping in the Republican primary race between Gov. Rick Perry and Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, Schieffer said, “I think it’s about to go down a petty, mean and nasty road.”

You don’t say.

A rivalry almost 20 years in the making between Gov. Rick Perry and U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison erupted in open acrimony Monday as she accused him of playing politics to embarrass one of her supporters while he all but accused her of shirking her duties in the nation’s capital.

The verbal snipes exposed a growing bitterness between Perry and Hutchison as she prepares to challenge his re-election in next year’s gubernatorial primary.

When my daughters act like this, we put them in timeout. Sadly, that option doesn’t exist here.

Back to the original story:

Schieffer calls himself a moderate Democrat with ideas about how to make Texas competitive.

“We’ve got some substantive challenges in Texas, and we’ve got to deal with them in a substantive way,” he said.

From the outside, Schieffer said, the image of Texas is still drawn from the TV show Dallas and that the Lone Star State is not preparing the next generation to compete in a global economy.

“Kids in Texas in the first grade are competing with kids in India and China,” he said. “I’m not sure we’re preparing them for it.”

Asked about Perry, Schieffer said, “If you had better leadership, you’d have better perception.”

“People want to respond to a thoughtful government figure,” he said. “I don’t know that I’m that candidate. There’s a constituency for that kind of candidate.”

Schieffer met with friends and colleagues during his driving tour of Texas with his wife, and many encouraged him to run.

“People believe there is an opportunity for a moderate Democrat to be elected,” he said.

I’d rather have a more progressive Democrat, but beggars and choosers and all that. Schieffer has a lot of baggage to deal with – the Bush thing, the “who the heck is this old white guy?” thing, his own legislative record (thanks, Evan) – but the more he’s out there criticizing our two squabblers in chief and looking good by comparison, the farther he’ll get with that.

And hey, it’s not like we’re up to our clavicles in better options at this point.

Humorist and author Kinky Friedman may run for Texas governor again, but if he does, he says he’s serious this time.

First, he’d run with the help of a major party — the Democrats — instead of launching an independent campaign like he did in 2006.

Friedman told the Associated Press on Tuesday he learned some hard lessons from his fourth-place defeat to Republican Rick Perry in a race with three political veterans. He said he found out he couldn’t win as an independent and that he shouldn’t crack so many jokes.

“I’m toning down the one-liners a bit. If I run, it’s going to be a serious run,” said Friedman, peppering the interview with one-liners.

[…]

He said he’s been a Democrat all his life — though “not the kind of Democrat that goose-steps to the polling box” — and that he likes the direction the state party is taking.

Democrats can win the state’s highest office if they pull in what he calls grass-roots voters and small-town Texans, Friedman said. He considers rural support one of his strengths.

“I certainly like the way the Democratic Party is moving in Texas. I think the past four years it’s kind of transformed itself into a more populist … it’s in a populist direction. In other words, I think they’re moving toward Barbara Jordan and Ann Richards and (commentator) Molly Ivins… That kind of thing,” he said.

Yeah, a Democrat all his life, except for the whole 2006 election thing and his votes for Republicans – in his defense, at least he bothered to vote that year. Anything you can say against Tom Schieffer, you can say at least as much against Kinky Friedman as well, that’s all I’m saying.

Yet there may be a brighter light at the end of all this. Again back to the Star-Telegram story:

So far, no Democrats have announced that they are seeking the nomination, although [Democratic strategist Matt] Angle said that several, including state Sen. Leticia Van de Putte, D-San Antonio, are considering it.

Sen. Van de Putte would be an exciting candidate, one about whom there’d be little griping among the faithful. She’s previously been mentioned as a potential Senate candidate; good to know at least one such Democrat has a broader view of the situation. She also had a bit more than $300K cash on hand as of January, and ought to be in a decent position to raise what she’d need to compete. All of a sudden, I’m feeling a little better about the top of the ticket next year. Amazing what some hope can do, isn’t it?

Strip club fee back in court

You may recall that in the last legislative session, a bill (HB1751) was passed that imposed a $5 per customer fee on strip clubs, with the revenue going to a sex assault prevention fund, among other things. That fee was ruled unconstitutional by a Travis County judge in March. Now everyone involved is back in court for the first round of appeals.

In arguments before the state Third Court of Appeals, Texas Solicitor General James Ho said the government should be allowed to collect the fee in part because it can already regulate nude dancing as well as sales of alcohol.

The law specifically applies to strip clubs that sell alcohol. By putting those two elements together, “a small and modest fee should be permissible,” said Ho, the top appeals attorney for state Attorney General Greg Abbott.

The fee is not a tax on constitutionally protected free speech, Ho said.

“Remove the alcohol, remove the fee,” he said.

The Texas Entertainment Association, which represents strip clubs across the state, strenuously disagreed.

“It is a tax on speech,” said the group’s lawyer, Craig Enoch, a former Texas Supreme Court justice. He said the fee is only charged at bars and clubs that have nude dancing.

“This is a tax that is assessed if you are entertaining in the nude,” Enoch said.

The state’s argument that the sale of alcohol is the key component would open other First Amendment issues, Enoch said.

“If this statute is not a tax on speech, the state could tax the Catholic church because it serves alcohol at communion,” Enoch said.

I thought the strip clubs’ argument was weak the first time around, but they prevailed, so who knows. The one thing that is certain is that this will be in the courts for a lot longer, which is making some proponents of the law consider other options.

Annette Burrhus-Clay, executive director of [the Texas Association Against Sexual Assault], said the group will work with lawmakers during the current legislative session to draft a new bill that protects free speech and provides a dedicated source of money.

I’ll keep an eye out for that. A statement from Rep. Ellen Cohen, the sponsor of HB1751, is beneath the fold.

(more…)

Strip club fee back in court

You may recall that in the last legislative session, a bill (HB1751) was passed that imposed a $5 per customer fee on strip clubs, with the revenue going to a sex assault prevention fund, among other things. That fee was ruled unconstitutional by a Travis County judge in March. Now everyone involved is back in court for the first round of appeals.

In arguments before the state Third Court of Appeals, Texas Solicitor General James Ho said the government should be allowed to collect the fee in part because it can already regulate nude dancing as well as sales of alcohol.

The law specifically applies to strip clubs that sell alcohol. By putting those two elements together, “a small and modest fee should be permissible,” said Ho, the top appeals attorney for state Attorney General Greg Abbott.

The fee is not a tax on constitutionally protected free speech, Ho said.

“Remove the alcohol, remove the fee,” he said.

The Texas Entertainment Association, which represents strip clubs across the state, strenuously disagreed.

“It is a tax on speech,” said the group’s lawyer, Craig Enoch, a former Texas Supreme Court justice. He said the fee is only charged at bars and clubs that have nude dancing.

“This is a tax that is assessed if you are entertaining in the nude,” Enoch said.

The state’s argument that the sale of alcohol is the key component would open other First Amendment issues, Enoch said.

“If this statute is not a tax on speech, the state could tax the Catholic church because it serves alcohol at communion,” Enoch said.

I thought the strip clubs’ argument was weak the first time around, but they prevailed, so who knows. The one thing that is certain is that this will be in the courts for a lot longer, which is making some proponents of the law consider other options.

Annette Burrhus-Clay, executive director of [the Texas Association Against Sexual Assault], said the group will work with lawmakers during the current legislative session to draft a new bill that protects free speech and provides a dedicated source of money.

I’ll keep an eye out for that. A statement from Rep. Ellen Cohen, the sponsor of HB1751, is beneath the fold.

(more…)

Video report from UH-Downtown renaming meeting

Con Frijoles has a video clip of his testimony last Friday before the UH-Downtown Board of Regents concerning the name change saga. I just want to add that while I think Houston Metropolitan University is a perfectly decent name despite the understandable concerns some folks have, I also think there’s nothing wrong with “UH-Downtown”. Given all the pushback the Board has gotten, it seems to me the best option at this point is to regroup, get consensus and buy-in from the community, and try again (if necessary) in 2011. I think the odds of a successful outcome for this session are rapidly dwindling.

Video report from UH-Downtown renaming meeting

Con Frijoles has a video clip of his testimony last Friday before the UH-Downtown Board of Regents concerning the name change saga. I just want to add that while I think Houston Metropolitan University is a perfectly decent name despite the understandable concerns some folks have, I also think there’s nothing wrong with “UH-Downtown”. Given all the pushback the Board has gotten, it seems to me the best option at this point is to regroup, get consensus and buy-in from the community, and try again (if necessary) in 2011. I think the odds of a successful outcome for this session are rapidly dwindling.

Debutant posts

This may not look like much, but given that Debutant has been in the ICU at MD Anderson since Thanksgiving and has nearly died multiple times, I think it’s pretty damn amazing. Please go leave some good thoughts for an incredibly resilient woman. And if you get the chance, make an appointment to give some blood. Thanks very much.

Debutant posts

This may not look like much, but given that Debutant has been in the ICU at MD Anderson since Thanksgiving and has nearly died multiple times, I think it’s pretty damn amazing. Please go leave some good thoughts for an incredibly resilient woman. And if you get the chance, make an appointment to give some blood. Thanks very much.