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May 7th, 2016:

Saturday video break: It’s The End Of The World As We Know It

It’s one of my favorite Celtic bands doing their thing with this REM classic:

The was Great Big Sea, the finest band from Newfoundland. Hard to believe you could take that song up-tempo, but there you have it. For comparison purposes, here’s the original:

I do, in fact, feel fine. How about you?

(Yes, I know, I already did this one, last January, with two other songs, both simply called “(The) End Of The World”, which is what Great Big Sea actually calls their version. I wanted to post these videos again. Sue me.)

What Council members think about the Uber threat

I was scrolling through Facebook and came upon this post from CM Michael Kubosh:

Mayor Turner wants UBER to stay, but they must follow the city’s ordinance that requires a CRIMINAL BACKGROUND CHECK and FINGERPRINTS. Council Member Michael Kubosh said that all public service drivers for buses, cabs, train, limos, shuttles and jitneys require the same CRIMINAL BACKGROUND CHECK and FINGERPRINTS. They must follow the rules. They came to Houston during the 2014 Rodeo operating illegally and the City Council changed the Ordinance to make room for their business model. NOW LOOK WHAT THEY ARE WANTING.

Which got me to wondering about other Council members and what they thought. Of the five Council members that voted against the original ordinance in 2014, four remain on Council: Kubosh, Jack Christie, Jerry Davis, and Mike Laster. I went looking, via Google, Facebook, and Twitter, to see who else has had something to say.

And the answer is, most of them have not said anything as yet. One who has is Brenda Stardig, who is the Chair of the Public Safety committee:

CM Dave Martin was quoted in one of the stories I blogged about after Uber issued its ultimatum:

“If you don’t want to follow the rules we all agreed to, have a good opportunity in another city,” District E Councilman David Martin said. “But we cannot be blackmailed when it comes to public safety.”

And that’s pretty much it for actual opinions. The only other Council member to say something was Greg Travis:

Mayor Sylvester Turner wants uber to stay in Houston, but wants the company to operate under the same rules as other transportation companies. Uber wants to eliminate regulation for its drivers to have city fingerprint check. Rather, uber wants to use its own background check. Mayor says uber’s background check inadequate. Your thoughts?

Comments on that post ran more in Uber’s favor than against, for what it’s worth. Also for what it’s worth. all four of these Council members – Kubosh, Martin, Stardig, and Travis – are Republicans; so is Jack Christie among the No votes from 2014, while Davis and Laster are Dems. I mention that mostly to note that if Uber is trying to make a free-market/deregulation argument, it’s not working on the kind of people you’d think it might work on. This discussion is just getting started, and Lord knows Uber is willing and able to dump a ton of resources into winning it, so this is hardly a final whip count. But clearly, Uber has some ground to make up to win this one.

Ken Paxton would like to remind you that he really is running for re-election

We all understand that’s what this is about, right?

Best mugshot ever

Best mugshot ever

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton warned Target this week that the company’s restroom policy could lead to criminal activity and demanded the retailer supply his office with its safety policies, stepping up his fight against transgender access to public accommodations of their choice.

In a letter laced with criticism of Target’s new policy allowing transgender people to use the bathroom best corresponding to his or her gender identity, the state’s top attorney asked the retail giant for a full text of safety procedures it will use to protect women and children from people who would use the company’s policy as a ruse for “nefarious purposes.”

“Regardless of whether Texas legislates on this topic, it is possible that allowing men in women’s restrooms could lead to criminal and otherwise unwanted activity,” read the one-page letter sent Tuesday to Target CEO Brian Cornell.

“Target, of course, is currently free to choose such a policy for its Texas stores,” Paxton wrote. “The voters in Houston recently repealed by a wide margin an ordinance that advanced many of the same goals as Target’s current policy.”

[…]

A spokesman for Equality Texas, an advocacy group seeking fair treatment for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender Texans, said Paxton is “looking for a solution to a problem that does not exist.”

“People fear the unknown and people don’t know or understand transgender folks, so they use the transgender population, a marginalized population, as a scapegoat so that they can incite fear in other people,” said Lou Weaver, transgender coordinator for the group.

Weaver, identified as a female on his birth certificate, said he began using the men’s room when he was 17 because he looked too masculine.

“I don’t belong in a women’s restroom, ” he said. “I don’t look like I belong there; I don’t act like I belong there. I just don’t. They are not thinking about people like me.”

To be clear, Paxton’s missive carries the same legal weight as a letter to the editor, or one of my blog posts. I’m sure Paxton is aware of this, and I’m equally sure that Target wasn’t his intended audience. This is aimed directly at Republican primary voters, to make sure they know that even though Paxton is an accused felon, he’s also One Of Them, and he will stand tall for their right to harass insufficiently feminine women in public restrooms. What else do you need to know? The Press and the Current have more.

Use of abortion pill rises

Until the Lege reconvenes, anyway.

Misoprostol

There’s been a sharp increase in the number of Texas women who are using the abortion pill to end their pregnancies now that federal officials have eased restrictions on the drug, according to officials at Planned Parenthood of Greater Texas.

Until recently, the number of women seeking medically induced abortions at Texas’ Planned Parenthood facilities had dipped to about 1 percent because of stringent guidelines put in place by state lawmakers, officials say.

That changed in late March, when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration relaxed guidelinesfor women taking mifepristone, a pill geared to induce abortion early in a pregnancy.

“We have seen a fourfold increase in the number of our patients choosing medication abortion since the FDA updated its protocol,” said Sarah J. Wheat, chief external affairs officer at Planned Parenthood. “From our perspective, it’s restoring options for women.

“It’s putting decisions back in the hands of women instead of politicians at the Capitol.”

No firm numbers are available yet, but Texas researchers and abortion providers say they see the increase and hope to have better estimates in the coming months.

[…]

Planned Parenthood continues to run clinics statewide, including the Southwest Fort Worth Health Center, a privately funded $6.5 million licensed ambulatory surgical center that opened in 2013.

A medical abortion has remained an option for patients at these facilities, but fewer women have used it because Texas law required them to visit the clinic four times for it, said Daniel Grossman, an investigator with the Texas Policy Evaluation Project and a professor at the University of California, San Francisco.

“In the six months after HB 2 went into effect, there was a 70 percent decline in medication abortions performed statewide,” said Grossman, who is working with researchers at the University of Texas at Austin to determine the impact of legislation on abortions. “Interviews with women … [showed they were] incredibly frustrated when they had a preference for medication abortion” and couldn’t get it.

Wheat said some women have had to travel 100 miles or more to reach a Planned Parenthood clinic, which put a hardship on them for multiple visits.

“That requirement alone created huge barriers for our patients,” she said.

Now that the FDA change has loosened restrictions in Texas — requiring a lower dose, 200 milligrams instead of 600 milligrams; fewer doctor visits; and allowing the medication up to 10 weeks in a pregnancy instead of seven weeks — more women are choosing the medical abortion option, Wheat and Grossman say.

Exact numbers won’t be available for weeks or months, but “many of the independent abortion providers who have already started using the new FDA regimen are saying their numbers are back up,” Grossman said. “Many women have a preference and prefer this.”

[…]

Now the question is whether Texas lawmakers will weigh in on the issue when they return to work in January.

Planned Parenthood officials say they hope not.

“The restrictions the Legislature put in place were not based in science,” Wheat said. “The FDA is the national expert in how medications are provided, and they approved these updates.

See here for the background. I’d laugh at the futility of hoping that science and rationality would prevail if it weren’t so painful. The best hope as I see it is for HB2 to be sufficiently gutted by the Supreme Court. That will surely only slow down the zealots, but it’s probably the best we can expect until we start electing different leaders.

Will the Ashby highrise ever get built?

Who knows?

Sue me!

Penelope Loughhead’s house in the leafy neighborhood near Rice University abuts the land where, nearly a decade ago, a proposed high-rise sparked a land-use battle that resonated citywide and throughout the local development community.

This week marks two years since a judge ruled the proposed Ashby tower could go forward after a monthlong trial and jury verdict that agreed with residents that the 21-story tower would be a nuisance to surrounding property owners. The judge agreed to some of the roughly $1 million in damages jurors assessed against Houston-based Buckhead Investment Partners but denied residents the permanent injunction they were seeking to halt the project.

Yet the 1.6-acre lot sits empty as both sides await a decision on their appeals.

“It feels like we’re in limbo,” Loughhead said. “We’re in the dark. We know they are allowed to build, but no ground has been broken.”

The developers declined to comment, citing the ongoing appeals process. They did not answer questions about the status of the project, although they previously told the Chronicle that the construction was moving along despite the appeal.

[…]

Attorneys for both sides made their cases during an appellate hearing in September. A decision could come down any day, attorneys say.

In documents filed with the 14th Court of Appeals, the attorney for the developers, Raymond Viada, argued against the damages that jurors awarded 20 residents who live near the Ashby project’s 1717 Bissonnet address. He wrote, in part, that the developers altered plans for the project after the jury’s decision and before the injunction hearing. Therefore, the project discussed in trial, which was ruled by the jury to be a nuisance, was no longer what his clients were proposing.

Viada wrote that the developers, who have already invested $14 million in the project, changed plans to reduce lighting from the garage, place planters on the amenity deck to add privacy and reconstruct its foundation to limit the impact of damage to surrounding homes. He wrote that the developers expect to net $72 million in profit if the project is not stopped.

See here for all the Ashby blogging you can stand. As I said the last time, it really boggles the mind to realize how long some lots in extremely desirable parts of town have been empty. The old Robinson Warehouse, Allen House, The Stables, and Ashby sites have been fallow for going on ten years. They remained unbuilt through a multi-year real estate boom that was especially hungry for inside-the-Loop properties. Now, in the midst of a low-oil-price downturn, it’s hard to imagine any of them changing status any time soon, and that’s without taking the Ashby lawsuit appeals process into account. I keep thinking that one of these days something will change, but all I’ve gotten for my trouble is that much older.