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January 20th, 2020:

Interview with Sarah DeMerchant

Sarah DeMerchant

One more time to legislative races, and one more time to a district carried by Beto. Like the others of that class, HD26 has drawn a full field of contenders to bring it across the finish line and into the Democratic fold. You could say that our first candidate. Sarah DeMerchant, has been at the forefront of this effort, as this is her third time running in HD26, having run in 2016 (getting 42.14% of the vote) and 2018 (up to 47.59% of the vote). DeMerchant has a degree in Computer Information Systems and a professional background in software development. She is involved in numerous community organizations and volunteered on the Wendy Davis and Barack Obama campaigns in past years. Her husband Ken was elected to Fort Bend Commissioners Court in 2018. You can hear the interview I did with her in 2018 here, and you can listen to the interview I did this year below:

The Erik Manning spreadsheet is back! You can track information for candidates on the Harris County ballot here.

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Elisa Cardnell – CD02
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Michelle Palmer – SBOE6
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Chrysta Castañeda – RRC
Kelly Stone – RRC

Vince Ryan – Harris County Attorney
Ben Rose – Harris County Attorney
Christian Menefee – Harris County Attorney

Jolanda Jones – Harris County Tax Assessor

Ann Johnson – HD134
Ruby Powers – HD134
Lanny Bose – HD134

Akilah Bacy – HD138
Josh Wallenstein – HD138
Jenifer Pool – HD138

Judicial Q&A: Steve Miears

(Note: As I have done in past elections, I am running a series of Q&As for judicial candidates in contested Democratic primaries. This is intended to help introduce the candidates and their experiences to those who plan to vote in March. I am running these responses in the order that I receive them from the candidates.)

Steve Miears

1. Who are you and what are you running for?

I am Steve Miears and I am running for judge of the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 4, as a Democrat. I grew up in Houston and graduated from Madison High School. I graduated from Austin College and finished law school at the Texas Tech University School of Law. I was a prosecutor after finishing law school. For the last thirty-five years I have been in private practice representing people in criminal cases who were indigent.

2. What kind of cases does this court hear?

This Court is a court of discretionary review of decisions in criminal cases from the 14 Courts of Appeal in Texas. It hears direct appeals from Texas trial courts where the death penalty has been imposed by a jury. It also hears writs of mandamus. Writs of Habeas Corpus take up most of this Court’s docket. Last year the Court handled over 3,500 writs of habeas corpus. These writs, filed mostly by prison inmates, challenge convictions on constitutional grounds including complaints of ineffective assistance of counsel.

3. Why are you running for this particular bench?

I am running for this position because I want to bring my values and understanding of the law to the Court. I am a Democrat and I identify with the values of the Democratic Party. Currently, the Court consists of nine Republican judges. It’s time for a different set of ideas about the rule of law to come to the Court. These ideas include respect for a woman’s reproductive rights, sensible gun regulations, an understanding of society’s evolving views on the death penalty, respect for LGBTQ rights, and the injustice of long prison sentences for non-violent drug offenders.

4. What are your qualifications for this job?

I am Board Certified in Criminal Law and Criminal Appellate Law. I have been named a “Super Lawyer” in criminal law by Texas Monthly magazine for the past 7 years. I have handled as lead counsel the trial and appeal of death penalty cases. To read a complete list of cases I have handled on appeal go to http://www.search.txcourts.gov/CaseSearch.aspx?coa=coa06&s=c:

Click on the box "Case Search." 
Mark  only "All Courts" to search all courts in Texas.
Put in my Bar number for the search field: 14025600

To watch a video of an oral argument I did recently before the Court of Criminal Appeals regarding police needing a warrant to get your cell phone records go to:
http://www.texasbarcle.com/CLE/CCAPlayer5.asp?sCaseNo=pd-1269-16&bLive=&k=&T= 

5. Why is this race important?

This race is important because the judges of the Court of Criminal Appeals decide the scope of constitutional protections of individual liberties and freedoms of all Texans.

6. Why should people vote for you in the primary?

My opponent in the primary was elected just over a year ago to complete a four-year term on a Dallas County judicial bench. I believe that if the voters elect someone to a position they have a right to expect that the person will fulfill those duties—before seeking another office. If she won, then the governor would appoint a Republican to be the judge in that court. I can’t believe the Dallas voters expected that outcome when they voted for her.

Because I have handled appeals, writs, and death penalty cases, I am more qualified by experience. I am committed to changing the Court for the better.

Meanwhile, the HISD Board of Trustees is still a thing

Meet the new Board, not the same as the old Board.

Hours after Houston ISD’s four recently elected trustees took office, enshrining the district’s first all-female school board, the new-look governing team on Thursday made its first big decision.

Trustees voted 8-1 to postpone approving a facilities assessment contract sought by the district’s administration, which would serve as a significant step toward asking residents to approve a multi-billion bond package in November. Board members will return in February to decide on the contract, giving them additional time to consider the ramifications of the deal.

Multiple board members said they wanted more discussion between the administration and trustees before spending up to $5 million on a facilities assessment. HISD likely will face headwinds in gaining support for a bond package, the result of dramatic state intervention looming over the district and a decline in public trust following months of board in-fighting.

“If it were that important, these conversations should have happened months ago,” HISD Trustee Elizabeth Santos said. “To spring it on brand new board members and expect a vote is unfair.”

HISD administrators said the facilities assessment would help the district craft a bond proposal, which would involve extensive construction projects at dozens of campuses, major investments in school security and hundreds of millions of dollars in technology upgrades.

Derrick Sanders, HISD’s officer of construction services, said the delay in a facilities assessment “wouldn’t be a fatal blow, but it would be a challenging one” for placing a bond request on the November ballot.

District officials have not placed a price tag on any potential bond packages, but it would likely exceed $2 billion and come with little to no increase in the tax rate. HISD residents last voted on a bond in 2012, approving a $1.9-billion proposal. Nearly all projects financed by the package have been completed.

So the obvious question to ask here, which the story did not address, is whether there could be a bond election called by the Board of Managers. It’s been long enough since the last bond election that there’s surely a need for some capital spending, and waiting four or five years till the elected Board is fully back in place could ensure that the need is too great to be sufficiently addressed. These bonds usually pass without too much trouble – the 2012 bond got 69% of the vote – but it’s not hard to imagine a 2020 issue being controversial. I don’t know what the best course of action is here, but I hope the new Board figures it out quickly. Aren’t y’all glad you signed up for this?